The Heat Is Online

April Snow Slams Midwest

April snowstorm slams Midwest

More flights cancelled on Tuesday

CNN.com, April 2, 2002

April began with a dose of winter across the upper Midwest as snow caused hundreds of traffic accidents.

More snow fell across the region Tuesday, adding to the 3 to 8 inches that fell Monday in Minnesota and Iowa and the more than 2 inches that fell in parts of Wisconsin. Snow flurries also moved into Michigan.

"It's going to be in bits and pieces. There's another piece of the system coming through," said Tom Helman, a National Weather Service meteorologist in Green Bay, Wisconsin.

"Living in Wisconsin in winter is not fun. And it is spring, so that makes this weather even worse," Lisa Heggestad of Madison said Tuesday.

The storm was blamed for at least seven traffic deaths: four in Iowa and three in Minnesota, officials said.

Most of the snow was expected to quickly melt, with Tuesday's temperatures in Wisconsin ranging from around 30 in the north to the mid-30s in the south.

Some school districts started classes late on Tuesday in Minnesota, where St. Cloud State University reported 8 inches of snow and up to 7 inches fell elsewhere.

Northwest Airlines and its Airlink partners canceled about 50 flights at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport on Tuesday, Northwest spokeswoman Mary Beth Schubert said. They canceled about 100 flights Monday.

Northern Illinois had thunderstorms Tuesday, with hail and up to a half-inch of rain, following a mixture of snow and rain on Monday that caused traffic accidents in the Chicago area. Tuesday's rain was expected to change back to snow by evening as temperatures stayed in the 30s, the National Weather Service said.

One 17-car wreck on slippery Interstate 35 north of Minneapolis-St. Paul killed two people whose car rammed into the back of a truck. A Minnesota state trooper investigating another wreck was slightly injured when his patrol car was hit by a vehicle that slid out of control.

Copyright 2002 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.