The Heat Is Online

Early June Heat Wave Broils East Coast

 

Heat wave roasting East Coast

 

Thousands lost power -- and air conditioning -- in New York during storm

 

The Associated Press, June. 9, 2008

The calendar may say spring but the temperatures in the East definitely say summer.

 

Heat advisories were posted Monday from the Carolinas to Connecticut, with temperatures expected to hit 100 from Georgia to New York, the National Weather Service said.

 

In the New York City area, the National Weather Service has issued an excessive heat warning and predicts 100-degree weather Monday that could feel five degrees sweatier with the humidity.

 

"It's just crazy. ... It's really, really hot," said New York City street worker Jessica Pena as she swept a midtown Manhattan street at around 8:15 a.m. The temperature already was in the upper 80s.

 

New York City opened 300 cooling centers Monday, said Office of Emergency Management spokesman Chris Gilbride.

The heat wave led to power cuts and subway disruptions over the weekend.

 

About 17,000 customers in and around New York City were blacked out by thunderstorms that struck late Sunday and the rising demand for electricity to run air conditions, utilities said Monday. A subway system power outage disrupted some morning rush hour service.

 

The heat and humidity will also be oppressive in Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington, D.C.

 

In Philadelphia, public and many private schools were dismissing classes at lunch time due to the heat -- and canceling all after-school activities.

 

District of Columbia officials declared Monday and Tuesday Code Red days for poor air quality.

 

In the Ohio Valley, a high of 93 was forecast in Cincinnati.

 

Parts of Massachusetts will break 90 for the third straight day.

 

The high Sunday at the Raleigh-Durham International Airport in North Carolina was 101, topping the record of 100 set just the day before.

 

Forecasters think the heat wave should break by mid-week.

 

Copyright 2008 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

 

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